Cuseum Uses Augmented Reality to “Replace” Stolen Artworks

Finding new use cases for VR technology has been quite challenging these days. In Boston, Cuseum is making a big impact in this regard. Their new experimental application uses augmented reality to replace empty frames with missing pieces of artwork. It is a very different approach compared to what one would expect, but it seems to work quite well for Gardner Museum so far.

Cuseum and Stolen Artworks

It is evident finding back stolen artwork is not all that easy. Despite modern technology becoming more common, there is still a lot of work to be done in this regard. Cuseum has come up with an interesting way to “recover” these stolen artworks. Gardner Museum in Boston had several artworks stolen decades ago. Unfortunately, they were never recovered, although the search is still going on as we speak.

Until the artworks are effectively back in place, visitors of Gardner Museum can see the paintings for themselves through a new experimental application. It is developed by local company Cuseum, and uses augmented reality to put the missing pieces into their empty frames at the museum. All one needs is a compatible tablet or phone to see the artwork as if it was really there. Although it is not the same as basking in the glory of these creations, it is a better option than looking at an empty frame.

This application is known as Hacking the Heist. Users point their device at the spaces where artworks are missing. Through the phone or tablet, the images appear as if the painting is still there. Right now, a handful of missing paintings are supported, but Cuseum hopes to improve its offering in the near future.

It is evident these new use cases for VR and AR technology bring positive attention to the industry. Although this is a niche market first and foremost, it is still quite impressive as to how it all works. We can only hope companies such as Cuseum continue to make a big impact in this regard. The future looks bright for VR and AR, that much is evident.

If you liked this article make sure to follow us on twitter @thevrbase and subscribe to our newsletter to stay up to date with the latest VR trends and news.